Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 151--159

Patient satisfaction with a pharmacist-led best possible medication discharge plan via tele-robot in a remote and rural community hospital


Paula Newman, Sammu Dhaliwall, Satvir Bains, Olena Polyakova, Kevin McDonald 
 Northwest Telepharmacy Solutions Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Correspondence Address:
BSc Phm ACPR Paula Newman
Northwest Telepharmacy Solutions Winnipeg, Manitoba
Canada

Introduction: Medication reconciliation (MedRec) reduces the risk of preventable medication-related adverse events (ADEs). A best possible medication discharge plan (BPMDP) is a revised list of medications a patient will take when discharged from hospital; a pharmacist review ensures accuracy. For many hospitals, on-site pharmacists are non-existent. Extension of a visual presence via a mobile robotic platform with real-time audiovisual communication by pharmacists to conduct MedRec remains unstudied. This study explored patient perceptions of a pharmacist-led BPMDP using a telepresence robot. Time requirements, unintentional discharge medication discrepancies (UMD), programme inefficiencies/barriers and facilitators involved in pharmacist review of the discharge medication list and patient interviews were also described. Methods: This prospective cohort study enrolled adult patients admitted to a 12-bed community hospital at high risk of an ADE. Remote pharmacists reviewed the discharge prescription list, identified/resolved UMDs, and interviewed/counselled patients using a telepresence robot. Thereafter, patients completed an anonymous satisfaction questionnaire. Prescriber discharge UMDs were classified, and barriers/inefficiencies and facilitators were documented. Results: Nine patients completed an interview, with a 75% interview agreement rate. All patients were comfortable with the robot and 76% felt their care was better. With a median of 11 discharge medications/patient, the UMD rate was 78%; 71% had omitted medications, 43% involved a cardiovascular medication, 88% were due to a hospital system cause, and 43% were specifically due to an inaccurate best possible admission medication history. Median times for interview preparation, interview and UMD/drug therapy problem resolution were 45, 15 and 10 min, respectively. Conclusion: Using a telepresence robot to provide pharmacist-led BPMDPs is acceptable to patients and an innovative, effective solution to identify/resolve UMDs.


How to cite this article:
Newman P, Dhaliwall S, Bains S, Polyakova O, McDonald K. Patient satisfaction with a pharmacist-led best possible medication discharge plan via tele-robot in a remote and rural community hospital.Can J Rural Med 2021;26:151-159


How to cite this URL:
Newman P, Dhaliwall S, Bains S, Polyakova O, McDonald K. Patient satisfaction with a pharmacist-led best possible medication discharge plan via tele-robot in a remote and rural community hospital. Can J Rural Med [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Dec 5 ];26:151-159
Available from: https://www.cjrm.ca/article.asp?issn=1203-7796;year=2021;volume=26;issue=4;spage=151;epage=159;aulast=Newman;type=0